The Latest on South Korea’s Supreme Court ruling

South Korea has dismissed the government’s claim that it violated the constitution by using a state of emergency to declare martial law, citing the country’s constitution.

The Constitutional Court upheld the constitutional amendment last week, but South Korea did not declare martial rule, according to a statement issued by the country on Tuesday.

The court also ruled that the government cannot ban or detain people who were in the country for a “security purpose.”

The ruling came amid heightened tensions between the United States and South Korea, with the U.S. seeking to isolate North Korea after a nuclear test on Tuesday and South Korean leaders seeking to reassure their people amid heightened tension with North Korea.

The ruling is a blow to South Korea President Moon Jae-in, who has sought to put a lid on the violence, which has left more than 50 people dead in the last week.

The South Korean Supreme Court, however, said it would uphold the ruling.

The country’s Constitutional Court had issued a ruling in April that said South Korea must declare martial rules when it is facing a national emergency.

The ruling is expected to be appealed by the Constitutional Court, which is dominated by conservative lawmakers.

In a statement, Moon’s office said the country had always been committed to protecting the people, and that the Supreme Court had ruled that it was constitutional.

The Supreme Court has been criticized by the United Nations for its handling of recent domestic protests in response to a presidential decree that declared a state “of emergency” and a martial law.

Moon has promised to use the constitutional authority to ease the countrys long-standing economic woes.

The Constitutional Court ruling is likely to fuel opposition to his administration’s efforts to improve the economy.

South Korea has dismissed the government’s claim that it violated the constitution by using a state of emergency to declare…