Which drug can treat my epilepsy?

A drug developed by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and the National Institutes of Health that targets the genetic code could help patients with epilepsy treat their seizures.

The team reports the drug, called Epidiolex, was able to slow or halt the seizure activity of mice, and it could help treat people with epilepsy, too.

“This is an exciting discovery,” said Michael S. Nardelli, director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

The drug is designed to stop a protein from activating proteins that produce the chemicals that cause seizures.

EpidIOlex blocks a protein that does this and blocks a key part of the protein.

“We believe that the Epidiolx could be used in conjunction with drugs that are currently available to treat seizures in humans,” said lead study author Dr. Andrew B. Bailes, an assistant professor of psychiatry at Penn.

The drug targets a protein called the GPR109 protein, which is essential for controlling seizures.

It also targets the enzyme that creates the proteins that cause the seizures.

Bailes’ team discovered the protein after studying mice with epilepsy and comparing the protein with the protein in the human brain.

The researchers tested Epidios in mice with the disorder epilepsy, and in people with the condition.

They found that the drug reduced the activity of the enzyme involved in the formation of the proteins in the brain.

They also found that it slowed the activity in the mice that were genetically engineered to have abnormal versions of the gene.

“Our results suggest that Epidioxys action could be important for people with an abnormal version of GPR-109,” Bailles said.

Scientists are still figuring out exactly how to use Epidioprox.

But it appears to slow the seizure behavior of mice in the lab and stop it in the real world.

A drug developed by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and the National Institutes of Health that targets the genetic…